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Hydrochloric Acid Safety Guide

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  What is Hydrochloric Acid? Hydrochloric Acid, also known as muriatic acid, is the aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride dissolved in water. Hydrochloric acid has many uses, ranging from leather tanning and electroplating metals to heavy-duty cleaning applications. Both hydrochloric acid, a liquid, and hydrogen chloride, a gas, have the CAS Number 7647-01-0. Notable Properties of Hydrochloric Acid For safety and handling purposes, hydrochloric acid and hydrogen chloride are often treated interchangeably. Hydrogen chloride reacts readily with water vapor in air, forming vaporous hydrochloric acid. This reaction can also take place within the respiratory system, with inhaled hydrogen chloride forming hydrochloric acid when in contact with the moist parts of the airway and lungs. Likewise, hydrochloric acid can give off irritating hydrogen chloride vapors. Even with the overlap in hazards, there are still some different risks associated hydrochloric acid and hydrogen chloride. What Makes

Understanding DOT Class 7 Materials: Radioactive Materials

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  Definition of DOT Class 7: Radioactive Materials Class 7 covers radioactive materials. The formal definitions associated with Class 7 can be found in 49 CFR 173.403 . Class 7 materials are highly specific in regulations associated with them. Only a properly trained professional should be handling and packing Class 7 materials. Types within Class 7 Different types of sub-classifications are used in Class 7. Normal Form is the default type of Class 7 material. There is also a Special Form Class 7 material, which is a non-dispersible solid radioactive material or radioactive material in a sealed capsule, which meets the requirements of the definition . There are Type A and Type B quantities. Type A packages are a form of limited quantity, defined by ranges of radionuclide values. Type B packages have radionuclide values greater than the limits for Type A. These types determine what form of packaging is required for a given shipment of radioactive material. Relationship

Understanding DOT Class 6 Materials: Poisonous and Infectious Substance Materials

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  Definition of DOT Class 6: Poisonous and Infectious Substance Materials Class 6 covers poisonous and infectious substance materials. The formal definition for 6.1 poisonous materials can be found at 49 CFR 173.132 and the formal definition for 6.2 infectious substances can be found at 49 CFR 173.134 . Class 6 Divisions Class 6 materials are grouped into two divisions. Division 6.1 Division 6.1 materials are poisonous materials, which can be toxic to humans through the exposure routes of oral toxicity, dermal toxicity, and/or inhalation toxicity. Division 6.2 Division 6.2 materials are infectious substances, consisting of pathogens including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi. Division 6.2 materials are further subdivided into Category A and Category B substances. Category A substances can cause long-term, permanent injury or life-threatening illness. Category B substances do not have a risk of causing long-term, permanent injury or life-threatening illness.

The Written Hazard Communication Program - Safety Requirement and Safety Tool

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  An Introduction to the Written Hazard Communication Program A Written Hazard Communication Program (WHCP) is a technical and regulatory document that is used to describe how the criteria for compliance with OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) are being met by an employer. The full text for the Hazard Communication Standard can be found at 29 CFR 1910.1200 and the requirements for the Written Hazard Communication Program are found at 1910.1200(e) . What is a Written Hazard Communication Program (WHCP)? The WHCP is a written document which describes how an employer will meet the requirements for labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and employee information and training that are necessary at the workplace. The WHCP must also contain a list of the hazardous chemicals known to be present in the workplace and the methods the employer will use to inform employees of hazards associated with non-routine tasks. The WHCP has important additions if there a multi-emp

Understanding DOT Class 5 Materials: Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides

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  Definition of DOT Class 5: Oxidizer and Organic Peroxide Materials Class 5 covers oxidizers and organic peroxides. The formal definition for 5.1 oxidizers can be found at 49 CFR 173.127 and the formal definition for 5.2 organic peroxides can be found at 49 CFR 173.128 . Class 5 Divisions Class 5 materials are grouped into two divisions. Division 5.1 Division 5.1 materials are oxidizers, meaning materials that can increase the potency of a fire. This mechanism is typically associated with the release of oxygen by decomposition. Division 5.2 Division 5.2 materials are organic peroxides, containing the bivalent -O-O- structure. These materials are further subdivided into 7 types (A-G) depending on if they can detonate, deflagrate, and/or undergo a thermal explosion. Relationship Between Class 5 and OSHA Hazard Classifications Division 5.1 materials overlap with the OSHA Physical Hazard classifications of Oxidizing Liquids and Oxidizing Solids depending on their ph

Lauric Acid Safety Guide

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   What is Lauric Acid? Lauric acid, also known as dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid which is solid at room temperature. Lauric acid is a major component in both coconut oil and palm kernel oil. Lauric acid has the CAS Number 143-07-7. The CAS Number is used to identify lauric acid as an ingredient on safety data sheets (SDS) and other safety documentation. When looking for lauric acid as an ingredient in products, look for the CAS Number within the composition table. Notable Properties of Lauric Acid Lauric acid is a solid at room temperature, white in color, with minimal odor described as either soap or bay oil. What Makes Lauric Acid Hazardous? Pure lauric acid is corrosive and an irritant; it can cause serious eye damage and irritation as well as skin irritation. Some sources also indicate that lauric acid can be harmful to the environment. Due to being a carbon-based substance and solid at room temperature, lauric acid can also form combustible dusts a

Understanding DOT Class 4 Materials: Flammable Solids, Spontaneously Combustible, and Dangerous When Wet Materials

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  Definition of DOT Class 4: Flammable Solids, Spontaneously Combustible, and Dangerous When Wet Materials Class 4 covers flammable solids, as well as spontaneously combustible and dangerous when wet materials. The formal definition can be found at 49 CFR 173.124 . Class 4 Divisions Class 4 materials are divided into three divisions. Division 4.1 Division 4.1 materials are referred to under the name of Flammable Solids, and come in four groups. Desensitized Explosives Self-Reactive Materials, which are thermally unstable and capable of exothermic decomposition without oxygen Readily Combustible Solids Polymerizing Materials, which are liable to undergo an exothermic reaction under conditions normally found in transportation Division 4.2 Division 4.2 materials are referred to under the name of Spontaneously Combustible Material. This includes both pyrophoric material and self-heating material. Division 4.3 Division 4.3 materials are referred to under the name of Dangerous When Wet Mater